If The Father Is A Muslim And The Mother A Christian, What Religion Should The Child Embrace?

If The Father Is A Muslim And The Mother A Christian, What Religion Should The Child Embrace?

For reasons different from what a lot of us think we have in our minds, we find out that we get married to people whose thoughts, religion, and lifestyle differ from ours sometimes. A situation where the father is a Muslim and the mother a Christian; what religion should the child embrace? Actually there are families where both parents are indifferent about what religion their children/child chose, but this doesn’t happen all the time. Do you think the child in some or most cases could easily  get confused?

Religion is the opium of the people as they always say; with both parents being sympathetic towards their religious practice, what position should the child take? Can he afford to be neutral and become anonymous; not bothering if this has consequences or not? If you found yourself in that situation, what would you do? Would you glady accept if  your child chooses to be Christian as his mum even though you are a Muslim?

As a parent, can you afford to be neutral and not encourage your child to take after your religion?

Whats your take on this issue?



6 thoughts on “If The Father Is A Muslim And The Mother A Christian, What Religion Should The Child Embrace?” by iyandasdiary (@Iyandasdiary)

  1. I think the best thing is to marry someone who shares the same faith with you; this fosters unity in the home. if otherwise, it mostly put the children in a state of confusion. such children end up with no religion @all if both parents are devoted in their faith and otherwise.

  2. I agree with @shovey because the children will be confused, but if it has happened then they should talk and the father is the head of the family so if he is a Muslim he is bound by Islamic rules to teach his children Islamic faith but there is no compulsion in religion the children can choose whichever they want when they grow up.

  3. I live in a family like that, but my pman does not mind me going to church since it has been a childhood thing. So like you said it depends on the family.

  4. @Shovey, if the best thing is to marry someone who shares your faith, what happens when you fall in love with one who shares a totally different belief? Should you stop loving him/her? Should you go your own separate ways, let’s say the man to the shrine of Sango and the woman to a Church?

    I passionately hold the view that love transcends
    -religion
    -language/tribe
    -colour
    -race
    -individual idiosyncrasies

    Love ought to be true, unconditional, understanding, tolerant, never ending and not religious bound. If a girl is waiting for her Churchman to marry her, if she never gets one that she likes, she may end up spending the rest of her life with somebody she hates but religion has joined together.

    Being a way of relating with God, religion is a personal thing. Being a Muslim does not make my relationship with God identical with that of even the last prophet, MOHAMMED [peace be unto him]. In the same vein, being a Christian does not make my faith identical with that of JESUS, the GOD-made-MAN. Also, being a catholic does not make my intercourse with God the same as that of the VIRGIN MARY.

    In view of the fact that religion is a deeply personal thing, children with parents of different faith orientations should be raised with unbiased and unprejudiced religious education. The interesting thing is that I know two kids whose parents share different faith systems. While the father is an Islamist, the mother is a Pentecostal Christian. It is necessary to mention the fact that while the first child, a daughter, claims to be a Muslim, the second child claims to be both but more of a Christian. Their youngest sibling is still sucking mummy’s breast and is in a point of no decision.

    The most important, at the end of our sojourn on earth, may not be what faith tradition we professed and lived. God may only ask us whether or not we lived as best as humanly possible according to the principle of love. For me, in fact, there are only two kinds of people – good people and bad people. Any other thing, religion, education, exposure, opportunities,… Like my very good friend, @ameenaedrees, has rightly affirmed, “…there is no compulsion in religion the children can choose whichever they want when they grow up.” They can even choose to believe in science like Bertrand Russell, in existentialism like Albert Camus, in nature like David Hume, in communism like Karl Marx and/or in existentialism like Jean-Paul Sartre.

    1. Bravo! @innoalifa so much volume in what you said. I learnt from it.

      1. I’m really elated you learnt
        something from the fractured lines
        putting forward my fractured perspectives
        about this dragging but beautiful life

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