Tag Archives: Biafra

No ! They Won’t Tell You

They won’t tell you About the gory images of gruesome murders Of the streams of our blood on their streets No ! They won’t tell you About the pregnant women Whose bellies were slit open With their innocent babies butchered No ! They won’t tell you Of the Russian birds of horror Strafing and bombing, … Continue reading No ! They Won’t Tell You

1: The Great Facade that was Unity

Let me begin by saying that I had no intention of writing this book so early on in my life.  This was supposed to be one of my final works.  The ruminations and ramblings of an old man if you will.  Then again, I never knew things would get bad this quickly.  The world around … Continue reading 1: The Great Facade that was Unity

How To Die In A Protest

HOW TO DIE IN A PROTEST It’s a protest… And must not start across the bridge from Onitsha Assembling at Aba Road is equally good location. The crowd must not be violent or mammoth A peaceful march with banners produces same results. Move not like a mob, but with metered paces Gather not in odd, … Continue reading How To Die In A Protest

The IBI-GBO boy: A Biafran minority report

  “All is fair in love and war” – John Lyly’s Eupheus *** There lies the road to Ohazife village, where Obulu-Nne, the goddess of my left foot rules over the lush land and its rustic people and I often wish I could go back, walk down that dirt road and roam through the part … Continue reading The IBI-GBO boy: A Biafran minority report

I Was Biafran

Last week, the news of the solidarity march for the detained radio Biafra director went viral like the news of a pastor who was caught masturbating. Everywhere was muffled up in that news. The eve of the march was characterized with young boys who smelled of a horrible cross-pollination of cheap spirits popularly known as … Continue reading I Was Biafran

Biafra 2020

I’d seen many beautiful girls before but I’d never seen any as beautiful and as ukwulicious as this girl. She was a yellow pawpaw. The type of yellow that no bleaching cream could give. She was so graceful in her movement. Her ukwu moving up and down, left and right like the hips of a … Continue reading Biafra 2020

BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE, The Biafran Armageddon

BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE, The Biafran Armageddon Joshua Omenga Nigeria has swallowed a long pestle and can only sleep standing upright. Several years of misgovernment and incompetence – there is no need to enumerate – have brought Nigeria to an explosion point. The time is ticking, the fuse is readying to light, but before … Continue reading BEFORE IT IS TOO LATE, The Biafran Armageddon

A Review Of Ikechukwu Orjinta’s The Death Of Biafra

A Review Of Ikechukwu Orjinta’s The Death Of Biafra

A REVIEW OF IKECHUKWU ORJINTA’S THE DEATH OF BIAFRA Book: The Death of Biafra (Genocide in Nigeria 1967-1970). Authors: Gills Caron and F. Bonneville. Translator from French: Rev Fr Dr Dr Ikechukwu Aloysius Orjinta. Genre: Memoir, History. Imprint: Nsukka: University of Nigeria Press Ltd, 2012. Pages: 157. ISBN: 978-978-8446-22-4. There is no basis for unity: … Continue reading A Review Of Ikechukwu Orjinta’s The Death Of Biafra

bringbackourgirls

THERE IS GOD Oooooooo!

BOKO HARAM Birthed in the 21st century, A name to be reckoned with forcefully, Even babies in the womb knows that you exist, And when they step into this part of the world, They are been prayed for “May you not be a victim of Boko-haram And everyone says “Amen”. Both young and old never … Continue reading THERE IS GOD Oooooooo!

The Rising Glint Part 2

Ngozi’s temperature was higher and her natural colouring turned to grey. Her moans, once so loud, had quietened which scared her parents more. There was a stench of death in the air mixed with aviation kerosene and fear. Many felt the end was near. Clement pushed the wheelbarrow towards a queue in front of the tent, where … Continue reading The Rising Glint Part 2

The Rising Glint Part 1

December 1968 Ogbete Coal Mine Digging was continuing in spite of flooding in many chambers. Sweltering temperatures and cramped, claustrophobic conditions, meant the miners could hardly breathe, yet the work had to be done. Ogbete, the most productive coal mine in the whole of Nigeria, had scaled down production because of the civil war. Deep … Continue reading The Rising Glint Part 1