All posts by Gbenga

Gbenga Awomodu is a freelance writer and editor. His first short story, 'Dozing on Awolowo Road', was first published on Pank Magazine's This Modern Writer blog in March 2010. Since then, he has gone ahead to work on short stories for publication on various platforms in the near future. Egbe's Diary, his eclectic blog can be accessed at http://gbengaawomodu.wordpress.com. He lives in Lagos, Nigeria and currently works with Bainstone Ltd./Bellanaija.com as an Editorial Assistant.
UNILAG Memoirs: Notes from the Lagoon Front

UNILAG Memoirs: Notes from the Lagoon Front

In a few weeks, I will say goodbye to the undergraduate years. Like it happened to me when leaving the primary school and even the secondary school, I have started to have a deep sense of nostalgia. Barely five years ago, we all wore our matriculation gowns and felt really cool about ourselves. We never … Continue reading UNILAG Memoirs: Notes from the Lagoon Front

Ababuo: Another Night in Lagos

Ababuo: Another Night in Lagos

Many times, she wishes Papa had left when her people were forced out of this country. She hears of her native land’s progressive strides, how even Nigerians are now trooping to tap into the good of 21st century Ghana, and the fast pace of economic and educational development back home. She has learnt to see in the dark and think through the noxious fumes.

Memorable Conversations: Meeting the ED

Memorable Conversations: Meeting the ED

I walk in to the office that Thursday, some minutes before noon. After filling the visitors’ record book, I walk straight down, open the door leading into the reception area on the ground floor. “Hello, good morning! I’d like to see the ED.” “Please, fill this form,” the young lady politely instructs as she hands me the visitors’ form. I swiftly fill in necessary information and hand over the A5 paper to the eager receptionist who then puts a call through while I take my seat.

Dozing on Awolowo Road

Dozing on Awolowo Road

Every day I go to work on the bus with the other sleepers, workers whose days begin early, whose commutes are long. We sleep when we can. Some people complain about their working conditions. Some swear never to return to their offices again. But the next day we are up together before the sun. Look, there, even the bank executive sleeps in the back of his car while his driver faces down Lagos for him, like our driver who faces Lagos for us. For family. For nation. For love. For love, we are up for work before the sun.