Younger Generation: Instinct And Survival

Younger Generation: Instinct And Survival

They have called us names. They saw us as good for nothing. They always compare their time and ours and would never hesitate to use any derogatory word that came to their heads on us. It is even more suffocating if one have them in the family, and if one doesn’t, at least, one wouldn’t escape their verbal missiles in taverns.
They obviously had forgotten that theirs, in the words of late Chinua Achebe, was “A Lucky Generation” an excerpt from his “There Was A Country”. They enjoyed everything when Nigeria was in its tender age. Nigeria, back then, was a newly formed flourishing country well managed by the colonial masters. The old tongue waggers received first hand education in a stimulating environment created for the purpose of learning by the white. There tutors were unbiased in their assessments and gradation. They made them to enjoy great welfarism such as free meals, homely dormitories, simplified varsities and most glaringly, great transitory from schools to good paying jobs after graduation. Such was their time. They had it all.
The people who were our great insulters are the genesis of our problems. They corrupted the well laid foundation that the colonial masters had built the nation firmly upon. They said the white men had many flaws and had caused many problems that they couldn’t fix. They spoke so loud on papers and in many gatherings on how they would out do the white if given power. They chased them away and filled the administrative vacuums their pelting left in every stratum of the country’s life. One expected them to right all perceived wrongs of the masters, but alas, they worsen everything. They destroyed the well laid foundation that was built, that helped them and that is suppose to help us and many genetations to come. It all started with tribalisms, favouritisms, endless looting of the robust treasury the exiters left behind, wanton destruction of properties and civil wars. I think their youthful exuberance at eureka of sensitive positions should be blamed for their debacles as they occupied these positions in their tender ages. Wole Soyinka said it all about their ages in his write-up “Where Did We Go Wrong? Wake Up Nigerian Youths.”
Seeing us struggle, ought to make them cover their faces in shame. But no, they wouldn’t. Our struggles are a new invention borne out of their incapability at handling a virgin country. Our struggles for survival is new and they have no solution to it because they didn’t experience it. In their turn- taken power act, it is obvious that they have no answer to our plights as they kept making some experimental policies further compounding our woes.
Instead of them to acknowledge their failures, they laughed at us. They called us names. They said we lacked visions, imaginations and creativities. They wrote books, and appeared on televisions just to make sure that we heard them called us names.
They said we are a dance generation. That we would rather dance than do something productive. They had forgotten that productivity is whatever one does and gets a great rewards as such dancing and singing that we do give us a living.
The youths have succeeded in creating great avenues that they never thought of in their myopism. They never thought we could make fortune from doing music and dance. They never thought we could make huge money playing football and that was why they flogged us back then when they saw us play the leather game. They never thought we could make money by tapping into the inventions of others. They never thought we could be at home and make money thereby defiling the orthodox mode of making a living.
The elders should humbly accept the the fact that they have failed, leave the reins of powers of the nation they firmly held unto, take the rear seats in the vehicle of the nation and watch how the youths, not their numbskulls children that they bought first class certificates for in foreign universities, qualified youths turn all the ills they had made around and see Nigeria returned to the lofty paths it once was before they took over and the great echelon it would rise to in no distant time.



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