The Ladder

The Ladder

 

 

With joy and enthusiasm some begin

Not minding the distance to be covered

Full of strength and energy to ascend

Even without seeing the top from the bottom

 

A system of logical movement

Where the hand pulls and the legs pull

Its’s not a one man’s journey

If one aspire to get to the top

 

In the struggle there seem not to be pleasure

But high up lies the hope of an unseen treasure

Despite all agony and pains

There is a gain and all efforts not in vain

 

Never seems to be too much in a hurry

So there is no cause to be worried

Of either losing steps or falling off

Which simply denotes starting over

 

Even starting over does not imply failure

It just mean confronted to be comforted

An ample opportunity to begin again

Just better than the previous

 



One thought on “The Ladder” by Okeme James Jerome (@okemejames)

  1. I like the clearly expressed sentiment, @okemejames, but try to make your sentence construction more fluid; for example:

    “Never seems to be too much in a hurry

    So there is no cause to be worried

    Of either losing steps or falling off

    Which simply denotes starting over”

    would be better as

    “There is no need to be in a hurry

    So there is no cause to be worried

    About either missing a step or falling off

    All this means that you simply start all over”

    Also watch out for tense confusion in your writing, e.g. “If one aspire aspires to get to the top” and “In the struggle there seem seems not to be pleasure

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