AMAKA …trials of a helpless teenager

AMAKA

…Trials Of A Helpless Teenager

 

 

 

ISRAEL EZIEDO

 

 

ACT 1

SCENE 1. BUSY STREET. EXT. DAY.

Scene opens on a busy street in JOS (Capital of Plateau State). The street reveals people of all works of life; traders, buyers, drivers, hawkers etc. Amaka is seen hawking pure water to both drivers and passers-by. In another street Agnes is also hawking pure water. Both Amaka and Agnes are dressed in poor, old gowns and bathroom slippers.

CUT.

 

SCENE 2. BUSY STREET. EXT. SAME DAY.

Scene opens to reaveal Amaka sitting on an over-head bridge counting her money. Her bucket is beside her, with just one pure water in it. Agnes comes towards Amaka half dancing, half trotting into shot with an empty bucket on one hand and some money on the other.

 

AGNES:

(Laughing) You know, if I continue to make this kind of sales, I could save enough money to buy you as a slave.

AMAKA:

What do you mean by that? Who are you going to buy?

AGNES:

(Still laughing) Sorry oh madam. I was only joking with you.

AMAKA:

That joke was not funny at all. And please stop calling me madam.

AGNES:

Why?

AMAKA:

Well, let’s say if being a madam means I have to be as wicked as my aunt, then I prefer to be a servant forever.

AGNES:

(Starting a joke. Stands up and imitates Mrs. Ngozi) Amaka! Amaka! Where is that good for nothing village girl?

AMAKA:

(Picking up the joke, kneels before Agnes) Yes aunty!

AGNES:

Who is your aunty? Eh? Now listen very carefully to this. I am going to the market women gossiping association to hear the latest gossip. Make sure you sweep the chairs, wash the compound and dust the plates. When you have finished, prepare porridge yam for me and my fat husband. Do you hear me?

 

They both burst into laughter; give high-five’s, sit down and continue laughing. A few passers-by turn around to look at the weird scene Amaka and Agnes are making. Their Laughter dies down after a while.

 

AMAKA:

(Sighs and looks up pensively) You know, I have faith in God that one day all this stress will go away and I will be able to return to school as well as have the love of a wonderful family.

AGNES:

(Sarcastically) Please let God answer your prayers so that you can leave and I can have this whole street to myself. See, if you leave I will make more sales than when two people are…

AMAKA:

(Cutting in) Wait o, Agnes, when will you have common sense and start thinking of your future?

AGNES:

See this one o. You are saying that an intelligent business woman like myself does not have common sense?

AMAKA:

(Snorts) Intelligent ko! Intelligent ni! Tell that to the rats in your house, they may believe you.

AGNES:

Ooh… you mean the ones you left behind the last time you came?

Their playful argument fades. CUT.

SCENE 3. MR IDOKO’S HOUSE. INT. DAY.

 

Scene opens in Samuel’s room. A wall clock in the room reveals the time to be 8:15am. Samuel is lying on his bed in his pyjamas, sleeping. Mrs. Grace comes into the room. She stands and looks at the clock for a while then she moves toward Samuel on the bed.

 

MRS. GRACE:

(Shaking his shoulder slightly) Sammy… Sammy boy… Sammy…

SAMUEL:

(Silence)

MRS. GRACE:

(Shaking him vigorously) Sammy… Sammy… (Becoming impatient, shouts close to his ears) Samuel Idoko!

SAMUEL:

(Jerks up at the scream, turns around sharply and seeing his mum, groans and tries to get back to sleep)

MRS. GRACE:

(Shakes him more vigorously) Sammy will you stop acting like a child and get up from the bed. Look at the time; it is almost twenty minutes past eight. Your mates are in school and you are still in bed.

SAMUEL:

(Stirs in bed and murmurs something incoherently)

MRS. GRACE:

What? What did you say?

SAMUEL:

(Stirs and murmurs again)

MRS. GRACE:

Ok, time up. Get up now! (Drags him by the hand to the edge of the bed)

SAMUEL:

(Sluggishly sits on the edge of the bed still groaning)

MRS. GRACE:

(Pulls him to his feet and pushes him close to the bathroom door where he stands, still groaning. Turns to his wardrobe and brings out his towel and his school uniform. Drops the uniform on his bed; throws his towel on him and pushes him further to the bathroom).

 

Samuel locks the door as Mrs. Grace turns to leave.

 

MRS. GRACE:

Sammy, come down and eat when you are ready.

CUT.

 

 

SCENE 4. MR IDOKO’S HOUSE. EXT. SAME DAY.

 

Scene opens to show Mrs. Grace in the driver’s seat of a jeep. She blows her horn repeatedly and looks out to the door of the house frequently. After a while, Samuel emerges from the front door dressed in his school uniform and carrying a bag. He walks up and enters the car.

 

MRS. GRACE:

I think your school should employ more discipline. If you went to school by this time in my days, you would have to work the whole day in the fields.

SAMUEL:

(Lifts up his hand to mimic an MC) Ladies and gentlemen, welcome to the twenty-first century (claps).

MRS. GRACE:

(Laughs and shakes her head) Seat belt, please.

SAMUEL:

What now, are we going to have an accident?

MRS. GRACE:

No, but I will be stopped by the Road Safety Commission if you don’t put it on.

SAMUEL:

(Looks up dreamily) I should go to school in an aircraft you know.

MRS. GRACE:

Tell that to your dad; he may get you a private jet with an escort (chuckles).

SAMUEL:

Yes, talking of dad, it’s almost three weeks since he left on his business trip. Isn’t he coming back?

MRS. GRACE:

(Looks away and shakes her head. She is clearly trying to hold back a tear)

 

Mrs. Grace revs the engine and hurriedly zooms out of the compound.

CUT.

 

 

SCENE 5. SAMUEL’S SCHOOL. EXT. SAME DAY.

 

Scene opens in the interior of Samuel’s class. It is a school for the rich indeed. The teacher is seen writing on the board. All the students are seated. Some are playing while others are writing and paying attention. Samuel is seeing sweating profusely and turning restlessly on his seat.

The teacher finishes writing on the board and begins to move around the class inspecting the students work. As he turns to face the class, the unserious students start pretending to be writing. As the teacher moves around, he notices Samuel turning restlessly on his seat and moves to him.

 

TEACHER:

(Surprised) Samuel, what’s the matter? Why are you shivering like this?

SAMUEL:

(Still shivering) I think I have a fever sir.

TEACHER:

O dear, I think you should go to the school clinic to get medical care.

SAMUEL:

Yes sir.

 

As Samuel stands up to leave, the teacher goes back to inspecting the student’s work. As Samuel moves out of the class, he tries to remove a hand-kerchief from his pocket, as he does so; a pack of cigarette promptly falls from his pocket. Almost immediately, a student throws a textbook down to cover the cigarette. Samuel, in pretence of helping the student pick his book, retrieves his pack of cigarette and hurriedly leaves the class.

CUT.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

ACT 2

SCENE 1. MR WALTER’S HOUSE. EXT. DAY.

 

Scene opens on the back exterior of Mr. Walter’s house to reveal Amaka cooking. She is cooking (eba and ogbono soup). She whispers a song as cooks. There’s a pot with water on the firewood stove and another pot of soup on the ground. She checks the water on the pot and covers it again.

Scene moves to reveal Mrs. Ngozi coming down the end of the road in front of Mr. Walter’s house. Scene moves back to Amaka; she checks the water, brings it down and replaces it with a pot of ogbono soup. She begins to make eba. After preparing it, she takes it into the house.

Cut to Mrs. Ngozi coming close to the front door of the house. Cut back to Amaka coming out of the house. She stirs the soup, gathers the plates around and begins to take the soup inside. As she is about to enter into the house, she almost hits Mrs. Ngozi who is coming out of the house.

Mrs. Ngozi shouts and jerks back in shock then she starts approaching Amaka with anger in her eyes. Amaka too, moves backward in fear, apology in her eyes. As Amaka moves backward on the pavement, she gets to the end and tripping, spills the whole soup on the ground.

 

MRS. NGOZI:

(Screams) Ewoo! (Turns and moves toward the soup with open arms as though to save it) My soup… my ogbono soup… my soup! (Turns and moves towards Amaka) You wicked girl… you threw my soup away eh!

AMAKA:

(Silent, looking confused. Still on the ground)

MRS. NGOZI:

(Still approaching her) You must throw me away o Amaka! (Begins to beat her up mercilessly) You must throw me away o!

AMAKA:

(Trying in vain to escape the slaps and kicks) Sorry ma… I fell… it wasn’t my fault…

MRS. NGOZI:

(Still beating her) O it was my fault, it was my fault eh? You wicked girl! (Drags her over the ogbono soup and continues beating her completely ignoring her screams and pleas)

 

Cut to Mr. Walter coming out of the house from the back door.

 

MR. WALTER:

What is all this noise about? So someone cannot have peace in his own house again? (To Mrs. Ngozi) Bia, this woman, do you want to kill her? (Moves to separate them) Stop this, stop this, ah ah (Separate’s them and draws his wife away from Amaka)

MRS. NGOZI:

(Still struggling to reach at Amaka) Leave me alone… leave me let me teach this stupid girl a lesson.

AMAKA:

(Standing afar, crying, covered in soup and sand)

MR. WALTER:

(Still trying to control his wife) Calm down woman and stop acting like a child. (To Amaka) And you go inside and clean up yourself.

AMAKA:

(Stands up, still crying and moves into the house)

MR. WALTER:

(Let’s go of Mrs. Ngozi) Ha! Na wa o. You want to kill that small girl because of a pot of soup?

MRS. NGOZI:

(Calming down) Walter I don’t know what your problem is.

MR. WALTER:

(Shocked) What! Are you talking to me?

MRS. NGOZI:

Yes you. Every time that girl does something bad and I want to correct her with a light beating you’ll start supporting her and disgracing me.

MR. WALTER:

Is it me you are talking to like that?

MRS. NGOZI:

(Mimicking her husband) You want to kill that small girl because of a pot of soup? I don’t blame you. How much did you even contribute to that soup? I prepared the soup with my own money that is why you have mouth to talk. Let me see what you will eat this night. (Mimic’s her husband again as she walks into the house) You want to kill that small girl because of a pot of soup?

MR. WALTER:

(Standing shocked. Then moves into the house) Listen, I am the man in this house. I won’t allow you to take my place. How dare…

FADE.

 

 

SCENE 2. MR. IDOKO’S HOUSE. EXT. DAY.

Scene opens on the interior of Mr. Idoko’s house revealing the living room of the house. It is an exquisite living room. Shot moves to dining room revealing Mr. Idoko and Mr. Jerry sharing jokes. Mr. Idoko is drinking wine while Dr. Jerry is drinking orange juice. Dr. Jerry is Mr. Idoko’s old-time friend and family doctor.

 

MR.  IDOKO:

(Pouring wine into his glass) You never cease to amaze me, Jerry. Of all the drinks in this world you choose to take ordinary orange juice.

DR. JERRY:

Haven’t you noticed that I look healthier than you? How do you think I achieved this?

MR. IDOKO?

See, let me tell you; you may be a doctor, but I know very well that pot bellies are not used to measure good health. Look Jerry, to prove that you are a man, you have to move from oranges (Pointing to the orange juice container) to strong wine (Pointing to a bottle of expensive wine)

DR. JERRY:

Ok, why don’t we try this; continue drinking wine and I will continue drinking orange juice and let’s see who dies first.

 

MR. IDOKO:

Ah! You think I don’t have sense. It is easy for you to win. All you have to do is to prescribe a poisonous drug for me and say it is antibiotics for headaches.

 

They both burst out into laughter.

 

DR. JERRY:

O my God! Idoko himself! You have not changed a bit since I knew you in secondary school. So tell me, how did your business trip go?

 

Cut away to exterior of house. A cars’ horn is heard repeatedly out of view. A gate man comes out and opens the gate. Mrs. Grace drives into the compound. Samuel is with her in the car. Shot also reveals Mr. Idoko’s car in the compound. Cut back to interior.

 

MR. IDOKO:

It was not easy at all. I had to make up the best lie of my life to tell the Senate President so he could give me an extra week off. The old man thought I was working tooth and nail while I was taking a break (chuckles).

DR. JERRY:

(Looking indifferent) Hmm! Idoko, I don’t support that idea of yours. you should know better than to lie to your boss.

MR. IDOKO:

(Looks at his watch) O my God!

DR. JERRY

What is it?

MR IDOKO

The meeting with the Governor! I am almost twenty minutes late. Please excuse me let me use the rest room (Rushes into the visitor’s toilet)

 

Dr. Jerry stand’s up and goes to pick up his brief case from the centre table. Cut to door from interior as Samuel comes into the living room.

 

 

SAMUEL:

(Going to hug Dr. Jerry) Uncle Jerry, good afternoon.

DR. JERRY:

Sammy! How are you?

SAMUEL:

Fine sir. How is work?

DR JERRY:

Oh, work is fine; just that it’s getting a bit hectic these days.

 

Cut to Mr Idoko coming out of the toilet. Cut to Mrs. Grace coming into the living room. As the two come into the living room, the whole atmosphere changes to a gloomy one. Mrs Grace’s and Samuel’s face drop in disappointment; Mr. Idoko’s face drops in embarrassment. Dr Jerry is a bit perplexed.

 

DR JERRY

(Trying to change the atmosphere) Ah! The madam of the house! How was your day?

MRS GRACE:

(Indifferently) Good day doctor.

 

Samuel turns and storms out of the room.

 

MRS GRACE:

Samuel!

MR IDOKO:

Samuel! Samuel!!

SAMUEL:

(Stops and turns to face his father with unhidden anger in his eyes) There was no need coming back home. We are already used to your absence (Turns and begins to exit).

MR IDOKO:

Samuel! Come back here! Samuel!

 

MRS. GRACE:

So what excuse do you have for staying away from your home for three weeks without calling or picking our calls?

MR IDOKO:

Didn’t I tell you that I will be away for long? I had series and series of meetings. I was even lucky to escape and come back.

MRS GRACE:

And you expect me to believe that lie? Since when have you decided to become so irresponsible?

MR IDOKO:

What! Jerry did you hear that? Did you hear this woman calling me a liar and an irresponsible man?

DR JERRY:

Calm down please…

MR IDOKO:

Stop telling me to calm down. Whose side are you on anyway? Didn’t you see the way this woman insulted me? (To Mrs. Grace) I don’t blame you. It’s my entire fault, not yours. I blame myself for not thinking before getting married to you. Jerry please let’s go; I have had enough of this nonsense!

DR JERRY:

Please calm down let’s talk this over.

MR IDOKO:

There is nothing whatsoever to talk about. Please let’s leave now before I kill someone. (Turns to leave)

MRS GRACE:

(Stands in his way, arms akimbo) And where do you think you are going? Can’t your legs stay in one place?

MR IDOKO:

Look woman, you have insulted me enough. Get out of my way before I tear you to pieces.

MRS GRACE:

Touch me, just touch me and see, shameless man.

 

MR IDOKO:

(Lands Mrs. Grace a very heavy slap. She screams, falls down and bursts out in tears) That will teach you to respect your husband. (Turns and walks out of the door).

DR JERRY:

(Standing mouth agape, completely shocked)

MRS GRACE:

(Weeping uncontrollably on the floor)

MR IDOKO:

(OOV) Jerry! Are you going or not?

DR JERRY:

(Goes to console Mrs. Grace) Are you alright? Are you ok?

MRS GRACE:

(Still weeping uncontrollably)

MR IDOKO:

(OOV) Jerry! What are you still doing there?

DR JERRY:

Please calm down ok. Let me go and talk some sense into him alright? (Turns to leave the house)

MR IDOKO:

(OOV) JERRYYYY!!!

CUT.

Read more at – www.discipleshipresources.wordpress.com



9 thoughts on “AMAKA …trials of a helpless teenager” by Israel Eziedo (@eziedo)

  1. Cool play. Is there a next one?

    Well done, Israel. $ß.

  2. Jo (@josephoguche)

    Cool

  3. I enjoyed reading this, Well done.

  4. @bubbllinna The full play is available to read for free @ http://www.discipleshipresources.wordpress.com
    Also, the part two of this play (For My Name Sake) is available to read in the above web address.

  5. Very easy to read and follow, unlike some other plays I’ve read on NS.

    But it felt a bit unfocused; although the story is titled ‘Amaka’ – the trials of a helpless teenager’, she seems to play a very small part in events. Maybe everything comes together in part two.

    Well done, @eziedo.

  6. this is seriously good first scene had me laughing with the imitations of the aunty.

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