Everyday Nigeria

Everyday Nigeria

Everyday in Nigeria is a hustle,
every single Naira, a struggle.
Commuters cramped up in rickety buses,
motorists and cyclists exchanging curses.
Politicians recycle promises,
the only opposition are those who were left out in the sharing of resources.
Universities are breeding grounds for cultists,
the law is nothing but a prostitute to injustice.

Everyday in Nigeria is paradox.
A cocktail of opposing factors.
the land where  ships disappear from harbours,
electoral materials take flight from airports,
And security agents are oppressors rather than protectors.
So many graduates but hardly enough jobs.
Projects for railway carriages,
always end up in miscarriages
The government always comes up with pointed agendas and visions,
But we are blind because there is no light to bring it to fruition.
Faith seems lost, our strength drained,
And when it rains?
There are floods because there are no drains.
We still can’t find water to drink,
or to cool the heat of our bottled-up anger which approaches its brink.

The giant of Africa?
The parlance seethes of irony.
Mocking the efforts of our founding fathers,
with no good but bad and ugly.
We are so quick to call the lord,
quicker to condemn those of different faiths to the morgue.
We can’t wake up to fulfill our dreams,
because we are deep in sleep.
The road to self-actualization is blocked,
with tents of ‘owambe’ parties and streets littered with bottle corks.
There seems to be no LASTMA official in front,
that’s why we are on the one-way to self-destruct.

Everyday in Nigeria brings opportunity,
from Zamfara to lasgidi.
A country rich in culture and diversity,
like the ingredients used in making opa-enyi.
Artful like the carvings from Benin,
resourceful like business men of Nnewi.
Its greatest strength lies not in oil, coal mines or tin,
but in the desire of its people to succeed.
Despite being constantly brought-down and downtrodden,
by a gluttonous elite.
We still display unphantomable ingenuity,
maneuvering through draconian policies,
re-buffing government’s insensitivity.
If only we could unite as we did when protesting subsidy,
shelve the propaganda of ethnicity.
Then futility would meet what they predict,
That we would break-up by 2015.



6 thoughts on “Everyday Nigeria” by chika nwakanma (@afroxyz)

  1. True. Nigeria’s greatest strength lies in its people.

  2. Some interesting imagery here. I love this lines:

    Everyday in Nigeria is a hustle,
    every single Naira, a struggle.
    Commuters cramped up in rickety buses,
    motorists and cyclists exchanging curses.
    Politicians recycle promises,
    the only opposition are those who were left out in the sharing of resources.

    Everyday in Nigeria is paradox.
    A cocktail of opposing factors.

    Nice one Chika. Well done and good luck.

  3. The rhymes men, the rhymes… that is all goodbye, thank you :d

  4. @chemokopi nice point, I got hooked there too for good.
    Chika well knitted!

  5. Nice rhyming; nice read. Hope we don’t break up by 2015 sha.

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