Ode To The Molue

Ode To The Molue

Like the UN ambassador you mediate and bring together
Blurring lines of stature, differences, tribal and culture
Accomplishments without training, knowledge or experience
You pull off with ease of fish to water

Before you distance we kept from each other
Indifference our second nature
Proximity equaled cacophony of sounds
A blending of smells, whiffs and odors
Almost acrid to taste, offensive to smell
Occasionally fragrance to dwell

Yet you manage to put us face to face with our worst nightmares
Almost kissing our greatest fears
Does time makes us bear or distance removes the need to care
But In that precious moment we share, care and endure
Why can’t this world be so

Up in arms, defenses at the ready
Armed to the teeth with words to kill, maim and defeat
Soldiers in arm keeping their distance combat ready
Until the next ambassador arrives
Offering the chance and opportunity to be human once again

To home we return oblivious of our combat nature
Into the arms of our loving family
Only to start the following day
Script for script, line for line
Like actors in a film we will never get paid for

Like the accolades given the UN ambassador
Our driver and his conductor deserve medals
For bringing together a people who ordinarily would not see eye to eye.



12 thoughts on “Ode To The Molue” by aturmercy (@aturmercy)

  1. Head bowed, waist bent and ‘yansh’ up for you suh!!……Conductor!…O wa o!!! This is my stop.

  2. This is good…
    Check this out though
    You pull with ease, of (like) fish to water seems better.
    Oblivious of our combat (combative) nature.
    Have your missing punctuation marks filled in..

    Well done Mercy.

  3. I like this, kinda reminds me of “a song for the common man” by Dolly Parton.

  4. An ode for this vehicle from you is memorable! Even though BRT is the in-thing, Molue has paid its rites! Nice ode.

  5. hey! the picture here is wrong! Those buses are not Molues!

    ermm…this poem reads more like an athem…so I guess it does a good job as an ode.

  6. Nice…I’m waiting for An Ode To Keke NAPEP

  7. Very interesting. I wish for a world (or country) that looks like the Molue, where the Driver is the President, and his conductor the Vice President. Good job.

  8. Nice, enjoyed reading this

  9. I felt some of the verses were not elegantly constructed, like this:

    Before you distance we kept from each other
    Indifference our second nature
    Proximity equaled cacophony of sounds
    A blending of smells, whiffs and odors
    Almost acrid to taste, offensive to smell
    Occasionally fragrance to dwell

    The picture you painted of molue passengers being in a permanent state of war was interesting, but I feel that most people just want to get to where they are going, and aren’t hostile to others.

    1. aturmercy (@aturmercy)

      Tola thanks for your input its quite appreciated. The whole idea of a poem is its ambiguity, at least to an extent. Based on who you are, you take away from it what it means to you. And what it means to you is not necessarily what the author intended to convey. Its a bit like abstract art… what you see, is what you see.

      At the bus stop, we all keep our distance from each other until the bus comes along. Coming along, we all gather and almost huddle together. In that same moment different groups of people are either talking together or at each other. In that same moment, body odor is aplenty, some good, some bad.

      Also importantly is that because you have to get to work or school on time. We all struggle to get on the bus any which way possible; pushing, shoving and trampling on anyone, as long as we manage to find our space of that bus. Who wants to wait and be late? Hence the reference to our combat ready stance to get on the bus, at least this was my experience.

      1. I see, @aturmercy. I appreciate the explanation.

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